Aloe vera ‘JL385’ | ‘Aloe’ | Live plant

25.00

Last one in stock!

Needing no introduction, the incredibly versatile succulent species, Aloe vera ‘JL385’! Live plant.

Only 1 left in stock...

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Aloe vera ‘JL385’ | ‘Aloe’ | Live plant

(syn. Aloe barbadensis, Aloe barbadensis var. chinensis, Aloe chinensis, Aloe elongata, Aloe flava, Aloe indica, Aloe lanzae, Aloe maculata, Aloe perfoliata var. vera, Aloe rubescens, Aloe variegata, Aloe vera var. chinensis, Aloe vera var. lanzae, Aloe vera var. littoralis, Aloe vulgaris)

We’re proud to sell these rooted Aloe vera ‘JL385’, which according to Joël Lodé (from whom we obtained our mother plant) is the ‘genuine’ species type…

Aloe vera is a stemless or short-stemmed succulent plant – reaching up to one-metre / three-feet tall – that has thick, fleshy leaves; grey-green on the outside and with a yellowish interior. The leaves grow in a rosette shape from around the base of the stem, with each leaf being up to roughly sixty centimetres / two-feet long and about two-and-a-half-centimetres / one inch wide. The edges of the leaves have small, sharp teeth along their margins. Gorgeous, pendulous flowers bloom in summer, growing from a spike up to one-and-a-half-metres / three-feet in height.

Generally known informally by names based on its local distribution (for example, ‘Barbados Aloe’, ‘Cape Aloe’ and ‘Chinese Aloe’), vera is a hugely popular succulent species. It’s synonymous with Aloe barbadensis, Aloe barbadensis var. chinensis, Aloe chinensis, Aloe elongata, Aloe flava, Aloe indica, Aloe lanzae, Aloe maculata, Aloe perfoliata var. vera, Aloe rubescens, Aloe variegata, Aloe vera var. chinensis, Aloe vera var. lanzae, Aloe vera var. littoralis and Aloe vulgaris. Some commentators believe Aloe vera to originate from some sort of crossbreeding, given that no-one knows the location of any natural, wild populations. Interestingly, based on various genetic research, the species is thought to be rather close to Aloe forbesii, Aloe inermis, Aloe perryi, Aloe scobinifolia, Aloe sinkatana and Aloe striata.

Besides ornamental planting (for which the species earned the prestigious British Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit), Aloe vera is primarily cultivated both traditionally and commercially for its gel and its latex. Uses for these derivatives include in the manufacture of gels, lotions and ointments (to treat cold sores, dry skin and psoriasis, frostbite, minor burns and other wounds), cosmetics (generally for its moisturising effects) and oral medication (for example, medicines to relieve constipation). It’s also an ingredient of some desserts, drinks and yogurts. However, we should note here that high or sustained ingestion of Aloe latex or whole leaf can be toxic (causing cramps and diarrhoea), and the whole leaf extract is now considered a potential carcinogen. Topical application is generally considered safe, unless one suffers from an allergic reaction. Where present, such reactions are considered especially risky for pregnant women.

Vera originates from the south-east Arabian Peninsula (of the Al Hajar Mountains in north-eastern Oman), although is now widely distributed around the Earth. In its natural habitat, Aloe Vera grows wild on rocky slopes and dry savannahs where rainfall is scarce. It’s able to survive these harsh conditions due to its ability to store water in the leaves, which gives it its succulent properties. This succulent species thrives in sandy, well-draining soil that is rich in organic matter. Similar to other Aloe species, vera forms symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhiza, enabling increased access to mineral nutrients present in the earth. The plant prefers full sunlight, but not too much water, which makes it a popular choice for indoor gardening or outdoor landscaping in areas with mild winters. Unless you live somewhere in USDA Hardiness Zones 8 to 11, we very much recommend moving your Aloe indoors or under glass over winter, as it’s rather susceptible to sustained frost or snow!



Product Details

Product Type

Live plant

Amount

1 rooted plant

Size

~35cm tall

Common Name

Bitter Aloe

Family

Genus

Species

Clone/Variety

Form


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